Posts Tagged 'New Scientist'

Modelling expectations to help focus

I’ve argued for, and am struggling to build, knowledge-discovery systems that can inductively decide which parts of the available data, and which emergent knowledge from the data are likely to be most ‘interesting’ so that an intelligence analyst can be guided to focus his/her limited attention there.

One important way of approaching this, which has the added advantage that it hardens the system against being systematically misled (which is especially a problem in adversarial settings) is to build in ways of considering what should happen. In other words, as well as the ‘main’ modelling process, there should also be added models that are constantly projecting what the incoming data, the main model, and the results should be like.

So I was interested to see the discussion in New Scientist of work showing that the human brain appears to do exactly this — we predict what the scenes we are looking at should look like, presumably so that we can divert resources to aspects of the scene that don’t match this expectation. Now if only we could make this computational…

The article is here.

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