Backdoors to encryption — 100 years of experience

The question of whether those who encrypt data, at rest or in flight, should be required to provide a master decryption key to government or law enforcement is back in the news, as it is periodically.

Many have made the obvious arguments about why this is a bad idea, and I won’t repeat them.

But let me point out that we’ve been here before, in a slightly different context. A hundred years ago, law enforcement came up against the fact that criminals knew things that could (a) be used to identify other criminals, and (b) prevent other crimes. This knowledge was inside their heads, rather than inside their cell phones.

Then, as now, it seemed obvious that law enforcement and government should be able to extract that knowledge, and interrogation with violence or torture was the result.

Eventually we reached (in Western countries, at least) an agreement that, although there could be a benefit to the knowledge in criminals’ heads, there was a point beyond which we weren’t going to go to extract it, despite its potential value.

The same principle surely applies when the knowledge is on a device rather than in a head. At some point, law enforcement must realise that not all knowledge is extractable.

(Incidentally, one of the arguments made about the use of violence and torture is that the knowledge extracted is often valueless, since the target will say anything to get it to stop. It isn’t hard to see that devices can be made to use a similar strategy. They would have a pin code or password that could be used under coercion and that would appear to unlock the device, but would in fact produce access only to a virtual subdevice which seemed innocuous. Especially as Customs in several countries are now demanding pins and passwords as a condition of entry, such devices would be useful for innocent travellers as well as guilty — to protect commercial and diplomatic secrets for a start.)

0 Responses to “Backdoors to encryption — 100 years of experience”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s





%d bloggers like this: