What causes extremist violence?

This question has been the subject of active research for more than four decades. There have been many answers that don’t stand up to empirical scrutiny — because the number of those who participate in extremist violence is so small, and because researchers tend to interview them, but fail to interview all those identical to them who didn’t commit violence.

Here’s a list of the properties that we now know don’t lead to extremist violence:

  • ideology or religion
  • deprivation or unhappiness
  • political/social alienation
  • discrimination
  • moral outrage
  • activism or illegal non-violent political action
  • attitudes/belief

How do we know this? Mostly because, if you take a population that exhibits any of these properties (typically many hundreds of thousand) you find that one or two have committed violence, but the others haven’t. So properties such as these have absolutely no predictive power.

On the other hand, there are a few properties that do lead to extremist violence:

  • being the child of immigrants
  • having access to a local charismatic figure
  • travelling to a location where one’s internal narrative is reinforced
  • participation in a small group echo chamber with those who have similar patterns of thought
  • having a disconnected-disordered or hypercaring-compelled personality

These don’t form a diagnostic set, because there are still many people who have one or more of them, and do not commit violence. But they are a set of danger signals, and the more of them an individual has, the more attention should be paid to them (on the evidence of the past 15 years).

You can find a full discussion of these issues, and the evidence behind them, in ““Terrorists, Radicals, and Activists: Distinguishing Between Countering Violent Extremism and Preventing Extremist Violence, and Why It Matters” in Violent Extremism and Terrorism, Queen’s University Press, 2019.

 

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